Open Windows Podcast
Jonas Zdanys Open Windows: Poems and Translations

Jonas Zdanys Open Windows: Poems and Translations

September 16, 2020

As I have suggested in my past few programs, "remembering" and "memory" are major elements in the creation of poetry. There are essential focuses or common themes that poems that include memories often use.  I take a look today at another one of those focuses, memories of places in our lives. I begin with one of those places -- the ocean -- as source of memory and as springboard for various thematic considerations.  I read poems by Matthew Arnold, Emily Dickinson, Robert Lowell, Pablo Neruda, and Penelope Pelizzon.  I begin the program with two of my own poems about the ocean.

Jonas Zdanys Open Windows: Poems and Translations

Jonas Zdanys Open Windows: Poems and Translations

September 9, 2020

As I have suggested in my past few programs, "remembering" and "memory" are major elements in the creation of poetry. There are essential focuses or common themes that poems that include memories often use. I take a look today at another one of those focuses, memories of people in our lives, particularly in our lives when we were children. This week I read poems about friends  -- especially as friends are remembered -- by James Wright, Derek Walcott, Arisa White, and Vytautas Bložė. I end the program with one of my own poems.

Jonas Zdanys Open Windows: Poems and Translations

Jonas Zdanys Open Windows: Poems and Translations

September 2, 2020

As I have suggested in my past few programs, "remembering" and "memory" are major elements in the creation of poetry. There are essential focuses or common themes that poems that include memories often use.  I take a look today at another one of those focuses, memories of people in our lives, particularly in our lives when we were children. This week I read poems about family -- especially as families are remembered -- by Ogden Nash, William Wordsworth, Victor Hernandez Cruz, Michael Luis Medrano, John Yao, and Ruth Stone.  I end the program with one of my own poems.

Jonas Zdanys Open Windows: Poems and Translations

Jonas Zdanys Open Windows: Poems and Translations

August 26, 2020

As I have suggested in my past few programs, "remembering" and "memory" are major elements in the creation of poetry. There are essential focuses or common themes that poems that include memories often use.  I take a look today at another one of those focuses, memories of loss and especially the loss of home. I read poems by Nijolė Miliauskaitė, Elizabeth Bishop, Abraham Lincoln, Zeina Azzam, and Rainer Maria Rilke.  I end the program with one of my own poems.

Jonas Zdanys Open Windows: Poems and Translations

Jonas Zdanys Open Windows: Poems and Translations

August 19, 2020

As I suggested in my program last week, "remembering" and "memory" are major elements in the creation of poetry. There may be some essential focuses or common themes that poems that include memories use.  I take a look today at another one of those focuses, memories of childhood. I read poems by William Blake, Dylan Thomas, William Matthews, Seamus Heaney, Yusef Komunyakaa, and Mary Oliver. I end my program with two of my own poems.

Jonas Zdanys Open Windows: Poems and Translations

Jonas Zdanys Open Windows: Poems and Translations

August 12, 2020

As I suggested in my program last week, "remembering" and "memory" are major elements in the creation of poetry. There may be some essential focuses or common themes that poems that include memories use.  I take a look today at one of those focuses, a theme that may be a principal dimension of what we write about, and that is love remembered because it has, somehow, been lost. I read poems by William Butler Yeats, Pablo Neruda, Sylvia Plath, Lorraine Henrie Lins, Algirdas Zdanys, and Susana Cuartas.   I end my program with two of my own poems.

Jonas Zdanys Open Windows: Poems and Translations

Jonas Zdanys Open Windows: Poems and Translations

August 5, 2020

My program today is about memories, things and people and events remembered. I try to affirm what I believe about the act of writing: that we shape the world through texts and use those texts to present or to hide truths. Those truths, in this context, are often things we remember and shape into something we can grasp and understand and accept or reject.  Once they are on the page, they can be directed and controlled, much more than they ever were as they were unfolding. I read poems by William Shakespeare, Robert Lowell, Hugh Seidman, David Breeden, Patricia Goodrich, and Li Nan.  I end my program with two of my own poems about the remembering.

Jonas Zdanys Open Windows: Poems and Translations

Jonas Zdanys Open Windows: Poems and Translations

July 29, 2020

I continue my programs about summer, today considering the silence and stillness of summer nights. A lovely quiet, a certain silence, outside, late at night, after midnight especially, fills the summer night air. It may be interrupted, here and there, now and then, by a passing and typically unexpected noise that we hear through open windows. The poems I read consider that: poems by Paul Simon, Cole Porter, T.S. Eliot, Ken Hada, Kerry Shawn Keys, and Antanas A. Jonynas. I end my program with two of my own poems about the silences of a summer night.

Jonas Zdanys Open Windows: Poems and Translations

Jonas Zdanys Open Windows: Poems and Translations

July 22, 2020

I continue my programs about summer. My program last week was inspired by one of the wonderful noises on a summer night -- the sound of trains passing in the distance. Today I read poems about another element that especially marks summer -- birds.  I include poems by William Butler Yeats, Wallace Stevens, Steven Schroeder, Lauren Camp, and Fred Burstein. I end the program with two of my own poems about birds.

Jonas Zdanys Open Windows: Poems and Translations

Jonas Zdanys Open Windows: Poems and Translations

July 15, 2020

My last two programs have been about summer. One of the things I like to do in the summer is to open the windows at night and listen to all sorts of things humming and buzzing outside the window screens. One of the things I most love, among all those wonderful sounds and noises on a summer night, is the sound of trains passing in the distance.  So today I read poems about trains by Emily Dickinson, Ezra Pound, W.H. Auden, Lawrence Ferlinghetti, and Bob Dylan. I end my program with two of my own poems about trains.

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